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Sunday, July 25, 2010

Good news for old people

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Good news for old people

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This report seem good news for old people



Sometime we need to look for good news, because it gives us hope for the future, as we all know nobody knows what is going to happen in the future, so it is good for us to hope, and for those who believe in God, it would be good if they hope and pray for a better future.
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In the news I found this report;
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A TREATMENT to halt Alzheimer's disease could be just five years away after a breakthrough by University of Sydney researchers.
The researchers claim they have isolated the cause of the brain-wasting disease in the interaction between two proteins in an otherwise healthy brain cell.
The university team managed to stop the interaction happening in mice genetically engineered to develop the disease by injecting a special protein into their brain using special implants.
"We have shown we can prevent the development of Alzheimer's, and that's never been done before," Professor Jurgen Gotz, of the university's Brain and Mind Research Institute, said.
"If we can prevent it developing, then there is hope we can find a cure."
None of the mice who were treated died, suffered memory loss or had seizures.
The breakthrough results - published in the international scientific journal Cell - offer hope to the 260,000 Australian Alzheimer's sufferers and their families.
Professor Gotz said the breakthrough was significant because it was the first time the development of the disease had been mapped. The protein was given to mice using implant pumps, he said.
Researchers are now working with pharmaceutical companies to further develop ways of administering the treatment for humans.
"What we have done in the laboratory has been extremely successful," Professor Gotz said. "The next step is to develop compounds that are easier to administer, either orally or intravenously.
"We could have treatment in five years because this is targeting the underlying biology of the disease, not the symptoms."
Without a cure, Professor Gotz said, families of Alzheimer sufferers, including his own, would continue to experience heartbreak.
"It's devastating to see how the personality is completely destroyed," he said.
The reasons why those who are susceptible to the disease contract it are still not known, Professor Gotz said, but it is believed some cases are linked to genetic factors.
Alzheimer's Australia NSW chief executive John Watkins said the group was guardedly optimistic about the findings, with the research having so far having been successful in mice.
"Although the research is in its early stages, it is the type of research that needs to be done so that we can find the cause, and hopefully the cure, to this terrible disease," he said.
Christine Fegan, of Mosman in Sydney's north shore, said her husband, Barry, 71, discovered he had Alzheimer's when he was 65.

She said any advance in treatment was wonderful news for families who had suffered as a result of a family member developing the condition.
"Obviously, it's going to take a long time until it's available to humans, but it would just be wonderful if Alzheimer's patients could recover some of their lives," Mrs Fegan said.
Her husband had begun showing symptoms when he was 60, but had been in denial.
"When his memory was failing, and he was making errors all the time, he just made our lives unbearable."

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Good news for old people
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